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When they say that ‘Israel is a light unto the nations’, this is what they mean…

Jewish Israeli News - Thu, 04/28/2016 - 8:42am
One shining star in a sea of darkness!

Next door to the war raging in Syria, doctors at the Galilee Medical Center are showing the true character of Israel.Watch:

Judaism Is a 3,000-Year-Old Love Affair With a Land

Jewish Israeli News - Tue, 04/26/2016 - 9:54am
Rabbi David Wolpe for Time

The connection to Israel is important in understanding modern politics
On Passover, Jews all over the world change one sentence in their daily prayers; instead of praying for rain, we begin to pray for dew. For in Israel the time for the grain harvest has begun, and if the winds blow and the rains fall, the grain cannot be harvested and will will rot in the field. Dew on the other hand, will moisten the grain without damaging it. That simple change in the prayer marks a profound truth about Judaism that touches on modern politics as well.

Twenty-five years ago I was returning from a two-day trip to New York. I ran into my teacher, the late Rabbi Henry Fisher. We began talking, and he asked me if I had changed my watch to accommodate New York time. “No,” I said, “I kept it on Los Angeles time.” “Why?” he asked? “Because,” I answered, “I would soon be home.”

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Acharei Mot 1

Torahportion Recon - Mon, 04/25/2016 - 10:17am
LEVITICUS 16:1–17:16


D'var Torah By Rabbi Elyse Goldstein for ReformJudaism.org

He shall be dressed in a sacral linen tunic, with linen breeches next to his flesh, and be girt with a linen sash, and he shall wear a linen turban. They are sacral vestments; he shall bathe his body in water and then put them on. (Leviticus 16:4)
A few years ago, I was in Jerusalem in a Chasidic neighborhood, surrounded by stores carrying tallitot, kippot, and all sorts of Judaica. To my utter shock, prominently displayed in one store's window was a bright pink tallis! I went inside and started talking to the owner, a Chasid in full regalia: black coat, knickers, side curls, and fur-trimmed shtreimel hat. "Who would buy a pink tallit?" I asked. "A bat mitzvah girl of course," this Chasid said, with no hesitation. ". . . no, not the girls in my community," he added, "but in yours, sure, why not?"

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Passover, Deuteronomy 14:22-16:17; Numbers 28:19-25

Torahportion Conserv - Mon, 04/25/2016 - 10:07am
By Rabbi Howard Stein for the Greater Pittsburgh Rabbinic Asssociation

The regular Torah reading for the eighth day of Passover discusses the consecration of all firstborn animals to God and the festival calendar, clearly connecting to the observance of the holiday.

However, because the last day of Passover falls on the Sabbath this year, we also read the preceding section, which describes the annual tithe and the shmita year, the seventh year when all debts were cancelled and (more significantly for Passover) all Hebrew slaves were freed. While we might think that this section is added on to give a longer Torah reading for the Sabbath, this section has its own connection to the themes of Passover.

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Sefirat haOmer: The Inner Journey of Liberation

Jewish Israeli News - Mon, 04/25/2016 - 9:53am
By Shmuel Gonzales for Hard Core Mesorah

Taking steps daily on our journey towards freedom
We now find ourselves in Chol haMoed Pesach – the intermediate days of Passover, the middle days of this ongoing eight-day holiday. After a gruelling week of preparation and a very energetic first two festival days, we are all physically spent, ready to relax and enjoy the rest of the week to come.

Still for many people the joy of the festival and that sense of momentum in our souls remains with us. As we each work through own personal exodus during this season. Now that we have determined to become free people, naturally there is a new passion to experience and actualize that freedom. And to continue this spiritual journey to become more liberated. A desire to push forward in this march of freedom still inspiring many of us.

So who do we do that? How do we become freer and more liberated people?

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ACHAREI MOT I

Torahportion Reform - Mon, 04/25/2016 - 9:46am
LEVITICUS 16:1–17:16


D'var Torah By Rabbi Elyse Goldstein for ReformJudaism.org

He shall be dressed in a sacral linen tunic, with linen breeches next to his flesh, and be girt with a linen sash, and he shall wear a linen turban. They are sacral vestments; he shall bathe his body in water and then put them on. (Leviticus 16:4)
A few years ago, I was in Jerusalem in a Chasidic neighborhood, surrounded by stores carrying tallitot, kippot, and all sorts of Judaica. To my utter shock, prominently displayed in one store's window was a bright pink tallis! I went inside and started talking to the owner, a Chasid in full regalia: black coat, knickers, side curls, and fur-trimmed shtreimel hat. "Who would buy a pink tallit?" I asked. "A bat mitzvah girl of course," this Chasid said, with no hesitation. ". . . no, not the girls in my community," he added, "but in yours, sure, why not?"

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Welcome to Queens College, Where Jews and Muslims Dialogue

Students - Mon, 04/25/2016 - 7:00am
Sam Kestenbaum for The Jewish Daily Forward    

On a recent afternoon in Queens, Secretary of State John Kerry sat with Israeli and Palestinian representatives, chatting amiably. “It’s great to see you two side by side,” Kerry said to the delegates. “Now, have we agreed about these land swaps?”

The Israeli and Palestinian smiled and nodded — a historic agreement had been reached; it seemed there might be an end to the crippling decades long stalemated conflict between Israel and the Palestinians.

But then the class period ended.

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My Special Sister

Teens - Mon, 04/25/2016 - 7:00am
by Noa Rubin for Fresh Ink for Teens   

I’m in awe of the intelligent and reflective young woman my little sister, who is autistic, has become.
“First you, Ron. Harry! Wait for Hermione!” my sister Naomi barked in a British accent while we waited in line for a waterslide. The other kids tried to go in front of us and she said, “No, sorry, but my wizard friends need to go first.” I apologized to the strangers and waited my turn. Later at the pool, a girl from the waterslide pointed to Naomi and whispered to her mother, “That’s the one who was talking to herself!”

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Sitting Down with Emma: A 15-Year-Old Social Media Maven

LGBT - Mon, 04/25/2016 - 7:00am
By Jordyn Rozensky for Keshet on MyJewishLearning.com   

Tell us a little about yourself:
My name is Emma, I’m 15, and I live in Chicago. My passions include cuddling, watching Netflix, social media, social justice, and feminism.

You attended the Keshet LGBTQ & Ally Teen Shabbaton on the East Coast, and now you’re joining us on the West Coast. What was your experience like at the Shabbaton?
I’ve been looking for a queer Jewish community for a long time, and when I heard about the Shabbaton (a gathering that spans Shabbat) through Facebook, I signed up as soon as possible.

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15 Delicious Passover Recipes For Tots

Kids - Mon, 04/25/2016 - 7:00am
by Rebecca Gruber for Popsugar
 

Passover may be all about doing without, but convincing little ones to forgo their favorite standby meals won't fly in most households. After Friday's first seder, removing leavened bread from a tot's diet doesn't have to be a recipe for disaster. We've rounded up some kid-friendly recipes that remove the holiday's forbidden ingredients but will still bring kids to the table at mealtime.

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For more Passover news, check out our    page.

Check out our Passover Holiday Spotlight Kit 

Yiddish Flavor

Traditions - Mon, 04/25/2016 - 7:00am
In ‘Rhapsody in Schmaltz,’ Michael Wex delves into Ashkenazi Jewish cuisine and the stories behind classic dishes—from kugel to cholent to brain latkes. (Yes, brain latkes.)
By Leah Koenig for Tablet Magazine


Michael Wex is not a chef. He’s not a lifelong challah baker, an avid cookbook collector, or even, by his own admission, much of a home cook. But his new book, Rhapsody in Schmaltz: Yiddish Food and Why We Can’t Stop Eating It, might just be the most important Jewish food book published this year.

As a novelist and author of Born to Kvetch, a New York Times best-selling book on Yiddish language and culture, Wex has established himself as one of the field’s few public intellectuals—the Malcolm Gladwell of the Yiddish world, minus the controversy. In Rhapsody in Schmaltz, he turns his attention to food, specifically the nostalgic brand of cooking served forth from the hardscrabble kitchens of Eastern Europe.

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Categories: All

Ma’agalim - Jane Bordeaux

Jewish Music - Mon, 04/25/2016 - 7:00am
The video for Tel Aviv-based Jane Bordeaux Band’s pretty, wistful acoustic song “Ma’agalim” has been making the rounds on the Internet, and for good reason—it’s gorgeous.  Enjoy!




 Ma'agalim - Jane Bordeaux from Uri Lotan on Vimeo.

The celebrated chef of Sqirl refreshes the Passover meal

Jewish Cooking - Mon, 04/25/2016 - 7:00am
by Naomi Pfefferman for JewishJournal

On a rainy Friday morning, the weather did not deter the devotees lined up outside Sqirl, Jessica Koslow’s nationally renowned cafe. Long lines are a staple at this tiny, vibrant Virgil Avenue storefront, located in a nondescript East Hollywood neighborhood not far from the hipper boulevards of Silver Lake. Inside, servers laden with colorful plates navigated the crowded space with the litheness of ballet dancers.

Despite serving only breakfast and lunch, Sqirl has amassed a cult following and myriad awards for dishes that meld flavors from North Africa, the Middle East and the Mediterranean — all prepared with farm-fresh California produce. Consider the Kokuho brown rice bowl, infused with sorrel pesto, preserved Meyer lemon, house-fermented hot sauce, watermelon radish and French sheep feta, then topped with a perfectly poached egg. Or the crispy rice salad flavored with lemongrass, mint, cilantro and ginger. Then there’s Koslow’s signature choice of some 35 seasonal jams she makes from scratch — including blood orange, Persian mulberry and elephant heart plum preserves.

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For more Passover recipes, check out our    page.

For more even more Passover recipes, check out our Passover Holiday Spotlight Kit

Are Today’s Parents Getting a Raw Deal?

Family - Mon, 04/25/2016 - 7:00am
Rhonda Stephens for The Huffington Post   

Summer 1974. I’m 9 years old. By 7:30 a.m., I’m up and out of the house, or if it’s Saturday I’m up and doing exactly what my father, Big Jerry, has told me to do. Might be raking, mowing, digging holes or washing cars.

Summer 2016. I’m tiptoeing out of the house, on my way to work, in an effort not to wake my children who will undoubtedly sleep until 11 a.m. They may complete a couple of the chores I’ve left in a list on the kitchen counter for them, or they may eat stale Cheez-Its that were left in their rooms three days ago, in order to avoid the kitchen at all costs and “not see” the list.

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But You Did Not Come Back: A Memoir

Jewish Books - Mon, 04/25/2016 - 7:00am
By Raphael Magarik for The Jewish Daily Forward   

But You Did Not Come Back: A Memoir By Marceline Loridan-Ivens
Translated by Sandra Smith


In 2015, more than 7,000 French Jews immigrated to Israel. A Jewish agency think tank began planning for 120,000 more, roughly a quarter of all the Jews in France. Jewish schoolchildren increasingly cannot attend public French schools safely. Under these circumstances, a new French Holocaust memoir cannot help but be a political manifesto. And indeed, Jewish, leftist filmmaker Marceline Loridan-Ivens includes some thoughts on France, anti-Semitism, Zionism and the like in her Holocaust memoir, “But You Did Not Come Back.”

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Jewish-Muslim couples tell their stories

Interfaith - Mon, 04/25/2016 - 7:00am
Nurit Canetti, Contributor, Israel Pulse

It was a real challenge to find people who agreed to be interviewed for this piece. While there are quite a few mixed couples in Israel, with one partner Jewish and the other Muslim, many of them are afraid to provide a glimpse into their fascinating lives. Now especially, when the street is becoming a jungle and hatred is bubbling over and blinding so many people from both religions, these families prefer to seclude themselves until the rage passes.

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Chol Hamoed - The Intermediary Days

Holidays - Mon, 04/25/2016 - 7:00am
Jewish Treats

Most holidays in western society last for a single day, which is often extended into the weekend. And while most people are aware that Chanukah is celebrated for 8 days, many people are surprised to learn that both Sukkot and Passover are also week-long holidays. The Torah explicitly states (in Leviticus 23) that these two holidays shall be observed for seven days. (Note: The holiday[s] following Sukkot, Shemini Atzeret and Simchat Torah, are independent of Sukkot.)

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For more Passover news, check out our    page.

 Check out our Passover Holiday Spotlight Kit

Phresh Organics

Going Green Jewishly - Mon, 04/25/2016 - 7:00am

Phresh is a company that produces and sells strictly organic, non-toxic preservatives by means of micro encapsulation of essential oils. We use technology that was developed for over 12 years in Ben Gurion University and the University of Florida.

Currently, we focus on organic preservatives for fruits and vegetables, hoping to drastically reduce food wastes at home. Together, we can make the world greener, more sustainable, and enjoy more yummy fruits and vegetables!

Watch the video


What We Lose As The Diaspora Shrinks

Feature Article - Mon, 04/25/2016 - 7:00am
By Rabbi Joshua Hammerman, Special To The Jewish Week

Back in my lithe teenage years, I used to Israeli dance with the best of them — that is, whenever I wasn’t nursing a sprained ankle caused by my congenital flat-footedness. OK, I admit it; while I thought I was pretty good, I reminded people less of Rudolph Nureyev than those dancing hippopotami in “Fantasia.” In fact, it was my stirring rendition of a gushing water sprinkler in Hora Mamtera that convinced the Israeli government to go all-in for drip irrigation. But I loved Israeli dance nonetheless.

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Thanks to Israel, Africa Will Never be the Same

Jewish Israeli News - Mon, 04/18/2016 - 2:13pm
From Israel Video Network

Together, they are bringing access to clean water and light to over 6,000 people across Africa, using Israeli technologies!


Innovation: Africa - Broadcast version from CBN Documentaries on Vimeo.

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